Joinery

WOOD WORKING BY DESIGN

Introduction

Joinery is the heart of woodworking. Be it simply glue, nails or dovetails, we have to have some sort of joinery to keep our boards together. While glue and nails certainly have their place, most of us use traditional joinery for nearly all of our work. What follows is a detailed discussion of the joinery that I make the most use of:

Tip!

You can click on any of the titles above to go to that particular joinery or just scroll down the page. Also, at the bottom of each joinery section you will find a blue arrow which will bring you back to the top of this page.

Mortise and Tenon Joints

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Floating Tenon Joints

I like floating tenons for several reasons:

floating tenon
Mortises in poplar wood boards with oak tenon.

Floating Tenons Help Prevent Mistakes
For instance, lets say that you're joining a rail between stiles with mortise-and-tenon joinery. With floating tenons you do not have to take into consideration the length of the tenons at each end of the rail because the tenons are considered separately. You simply measure your board to spec length and cut it. If using integral tenons you must measure very carefully so as not to make your board too short. A too short board is a wasted board. And likewise, a too long board is just another way to waste more wood.

Floating Tenons Save Money
Continuing with the rail-stile example cited above, you only have to cut the rail to its visible length. If your project stock is made of expensive wood nothing is wasted in making the tenons. Normally tenons are 1/3 the thickness of your board plus their length, which means that making integral tenon's requires you to waste good wood. Floating tenons, on the other hand, can be made of whatever stock you have in the shop. I prefer making my tenons from hardwood, but most softwoods will work just as well. Stress at the joint in question should be your guide. Corner joints get much of the stress so for those applications I always use hardwood tenons.

Floating Tenons Enable Creativity
if he chooses to do so. I recently built a cabinet carcase that ulitized through wedged-tenons. See photo below.

TESTING TESTING !!

Wedged Tenon Joints

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Finger (box) Joints

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Butterfly Keys

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Hasselblad Lens Mounting Problems

The following images show the camera body lens-opening and the camera body-side of the lens.

st.francis' brokena head
Hassie Image 1
This image shows the camera body with the shutter cocked.

The next image is of the lens and it appears to be cocked as well.

st.francis' brokena head
Hassie Image 2
This image shows the lens.